JOURNAL OF PACIFIC STUDIES
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Vol.27 no.1, 2004(12)

Title: Les Uveens en Nouvelle-Caledonie

Author: Pechberty, Dominique
Subject:  New Caledonia|Emigration and immigration
 New Caledonia|Population
 Wallis Islands (Wallis and Futuna Islands)|Population
Volume: Vol.27 no.1, 2004
Collation: p. 63-82

Abstract: More than twenty thousand people from Uvea and Futuna live in New Caledonia.Their migrations were made mainly after the Second World War and followed the fluctuations in nickel prices. What motivated these migrants? Have they realised their dream of upward social mobility? How do members of the other commmunities view their presence? Have they reached a stage of integration without having to lose their identity? Has this migration ended? This article attempts to answer questions such as these.

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Title: What developments for Wallis and Futuna? or, from the Tavaka migration to the emigration to Metropolitan France

Author: Angleviel, Frederic
Subject:  Labor supply|Wallis and Futuna Islands|Wallis Islands
 Wallis Islands (Wallis and Futuna Islands)|Population
 Wallis Islands (Wallis and Futuna Islands)|Emigration and immigration
Volume: Vol.27 no.1, 2004
Collation: p. 83-94

Abstract: The development of this tiny overseas territory is conditioned by a new balance between workers’ migrations and self-development. We will thus study first of all the wish of local politicians to reduce migration flows towards New Caledonia in favour of Metropolitan France. Then, we will analyse the report of the committee set up to consider all tracks that might lead to self-development. What emerges then is the question of sustainable development in island microcosms and the possible integration of religion or of custom in political and administrative reflection.

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Title: From Franconesia to Euronesia : what future for France, and the European Union in the South Pacific?

Author: Perez, Michel
Subject:  Intergovernmental fiscal relations|Pacific Area
 Oceania|Economic conditions
 France|Colonies|Oceania
Volume: Vol.27 no.1, 2004
Collation: p. 95-108

Abstract: France has long been criticised for her colonial presence in the South Pacific. As a matter of fact, though, if dependence is no longer an acceptable option in the early 21st century for most geo-political entities in the region, neither does full political independence give greater guarantee of economic and social viability. Besides, with globalisation on the rise everywhere, including in this part of the world, interdependence seems to be the key word. Taking this evolving context into account, this essay aims at assessing the role that France, and beyond her the European Union, can play in tomorrow’s South Pacific.

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Title: L'image de Tahiti vehiculee par les artistes anglophones et francophones a l'epoque

Author: Bechimon, Philippe
Subject:  Tahiti|In art
 Tahiti|In literature
 Tahiti|In motion pictures
Volume: Vol.27 no.1, 2004
Collation: p. 23-38

Abstract: In the colonial era, artists—painters, novelists, photographers and filmmakers alike—present a vision of a precolonial paradise, a pure product of Western imagination rather than of their knowledge of the islands they describe. By means of this skew, they gained a hearing for critiques of a colonisation that they describe too simplistically. Yet they often prefer to denounce the ‘other colonisation’, that of the rival power, rather than that which was their own country’s doing.

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Title: 'Words that go further than words' : the French language and writing in New Caledonia

Author: Mokaddem, Hamid
Subject:  Language and culture|New Caledonia
 French language|New Caledonia
Volume: Vol.27 no.1, 2004
Collation: p. 39-48

Abstract: Can art and literature help resolve ethnic conflicts in Kanaky-New Caledonia? The French language acts as a bond between the Pacific Island and the European communities, who are all francophone. We will explain this common thread through a description of Kanak and Caledonian literature.

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Title: The new shape of old island cultures : a half century of social change in Micronesia

Author: Monsell-David, Michael
Subject:  Micronesia|Social conditions|20th century
 Micronesia|Social life and customs|20th century
Volume: Vol.27 no.1, 2004
Collation: p. 116-125

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

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Title: Contributors

Author:
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.27 no.1, 2004
Collation: p. 303

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

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Title: The black and the red : radicalising anti-colonoialsim in 1970s New Calendonia

Author: Chappell, David
Subject:  New Caledonia|History|Autonomy and independence movements
 New Caledonia|Politics and government|20th century
Volume: Vol.27 no.1, 2004
Collation: p. 49-62

Abstract: The tragic ‘Events’ of the 1980s in French New Caledonia, when competing versions of nationhood caused inter-ethnic violence, led to peace accords in 1988 and 1998 that proposed a ‘common destiny’ for the inhabitants. But the increased autonomy Paris is now granting to the territory over fifteen to twenty years had already been granted in 1956–58 and then taken away in the 1960s. Four forces converged in about 1969 to radicalise local anti-colonialism, and thus polarise the multiracial society that had begun to emerge in the postwar period: France’s unilateral withdrawal of self-government, despite protest; renewed immigration because of a nickel boom; the decline of the first political party of the territory, the Union Calédonienne; and the return home from France of Kanak and Caledonian university students, after their exposure to the ideas of Marxism and other liberation ideologies. The latter regarded what was happening in their homeland as a ‘recolonisation’. But if human beings can create such structures, they can also amend or re-adjust them, thanks to the hard-learned lessons of their modern history.

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Title: The input of francophone archaeological research in the Pacific: a short summary

Author: Sand, Christophe
Subject:  Archaeology|Oceania
Volume: Vol.27 no.1, 2004
Collation: p. 1-12

Abstract: This paper presents a short synthesis of the major themes of archaeological research conducted over past decades in the Pacific region by French-speaking scholars. The importance of the intellectual influence of Professor J. Garanger is emphasised, as he established the major lines of francophone research: confirmation of oral traditions through archaeological excavations, the building of ceramic chronologies, the restoration of prehistoric monuments, and the development of local archaeological departments in French Territories of the region. Inquiry in these four problem areas has become characteristic of francophone research in Oceania. Various examples of recent achievements on these subjects, mainly for the western Pacific, are presented.

Original information

Title: Photographing Kanak women in the nineteenth century : a voyeuristic approach?

Author: Crane, Emmanuelle
Subject:  Photography of women
 Ethnology|New Caledonia
Volume: Vol.27 no.1, 2004
Collation: p. 13-22

Abstract: The colonising country, for its part, wrought a definite, though imagined, picture of the indigenous people of the conquered colonies. Portrayed and perceived as being naïve and primitive, but idealised by virtue of their ‘perfect’ osmosis with nature, these people aroused curiosity for their exoticism and the sexual overtones of their portraiture. The partially clothed Kanak model became an object and more of a stereotype, in the studio setting where ‘reality’ (or a sense of reality) was controlled. Stripping them of their clothing, the photographer laid bare their bodies to the lens. The very accessibility of these women reinforces the voyeurism of the camera operator. I challenge the proposition that the photographic representations of Melanesian and Polynesian women built on a foundation of racial and gender subordination were possibly the most significant French colonial images. Photography itself has, rather, set in concrete a cleavage between Polynesian woman and Melanesian woman. Tahitian women were seen in a much more positive and alluring light than Kanak women, who were considered plain and devoid of attractions. What is of interest here is the quite disparate concepts of native beauty that were current within French colonial society. French colonies in the Pacific rarely escaped this contradiction. Indeed the photographic representations of Kanak women differed considerably from those of their Tahitian counterparts. Can images play a voyeuristic role without sexual connotation? In Western cultural discourse, women have been perceived as objects of beauty and commerce. Photographs of women have played a central role, allowing the art of photography to exist, deepseated and silent, beneath a scientific agenda, thereby inflating readership and further legitimating the project as research into beauty and truth. The probable result, however, of the photographers’ presentation of their subjects’ unshielded bodies for close examination was the subconscious attribution of erotic qualities or even sexual license to non-Europeans (particularly women).

Original information

Title: Houses far from home : British colonial space in the New Hebrides

Author: Kaplan, Martha
Subject:  British|Dwellings|Vanuatu
 Dwellings|Social aspects|Vanuatu
 Colonial administrators|Housing|Vanuatu
Volume: Vol.27 no.1, 2004
Collation: p. 109-111

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Clothing the Pacific, ed. Chloe Colchester

Author: Clare, Shamier
Subject:  Clothing and dress|Oceania
 Oceania|Colonial influence
Volume: Vol.27 no.1, 2004
Collation: p. 112-115

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

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