JOURNAL OF PACIFIC STUDIES
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Vol.27 no.2, 2004(12)

Title: Twice migrants' relationship to their ancestral homeland : the case of Indo-Fijians and India

Author: Voigt-Graf, Carmen
Subject:  Fiji Indians|Indian diospora
Volume: Vol.27 no.2, 2004
Collation:

Abstract: This article investigates the relationships of Indo-Fijians to their ancestral homeland, both in Fiji and following their secondary migration to Australia. Most Indo-Fijians are descendants of indentured labourers to Fiji. The majority have long ago lost all personal contacts with India. During their stay in Fiji, their social, cultural and religious practices have undergone many changes. Their experiences with subcontinental Indians are limited and their views of India and of subcontinental Indians largely based on ignorance, indifference and stereotypes. Recent efforts of the Indian Government at fostering relations with its 20 million strong diaspora are aimed primarily at wealthy Indian migrants in the West and descendants of indentured Indians have attracted comparatively little interest in India. Many Indo-Fijians have left Fiji and resettled in the developed Pacific Rim countries, especially Australia. In the wake of this secondary migration, Indo-Fijians have realised that their social and cultural distance from subcontinental Indians is too great to be narrowed by a shared ethnicity. In the process, they have developed a Pacific identity.

Original information

Title: SSED PhD and MA theses 2003-2004

Author:
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.27 no.2, 2004
Collation: p. 304-305

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

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Title: Law and empire in the Pacific : Fiji and Hawai'i

Author: Merry, Sally Engle, editor, Brenneis, Donald, editor
Subject:  ChiefdomsHawaiiHistoryCongresses
 Chiefdoms|Fiji|History|Congresses
 Hawaiians|Government relations|Congresses
 Hawaiians|Legal status, laws, etc.|Congresses
 Fijians|Legal status, laws, etc.|Congresse
Volume: Vol.27 no.2, 2004
Collation: p. 291-292

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

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Title: Migrant labourers as British protected persons : the Gilbertese experience, 1892-1908

Author: Munro, Doug, McCreery, David, Firth, Stewart
Subject:  Indentured labour|Protectorates|Gilbertese labour|Kiribat
Volume: Vol.27 no.2, 2004
Collation:

Abstract: The process of labour migration, especially through indenture, was essential to the operation of European enterprises in various parts of the Pacific in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Treatment and conditions of labourers varied considerably but not for nothing was indenture sometimes called the ‘penal contract system’. This paper looks particularly at the nature of the ‘protection’ offered by colonial (especially British) powers as they groped to understand just what they meant by a ‘protectorate’. Seeking to understand the contrary British protection of Gilbertese labourers in German Samoa and the lack of institutional protection for Gilbertese labourers in Central America, the paper highlights the importance of the personal roles of individual actors in the colonial project whose efforts served to ameliorate somewhat the sad tale of this small group of inadequately protected ‘protected persons’.

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Title: New Guinea : crossing boundaries and history

Author: Campbell, Ian
Subject:  New Guinea|History
Volume: Vol.27 no.2, 2004
Collation: p. 287-290

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

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Title: Chinese contract labour in the Pacific Islands during the nineteenth century

Author: Willmott, Bill
Subject:  Chinese contract labour; contract labour, Pacific|contract labour|nineteenth century
Volume: Vol.27 no.2, 2004
Collation:

Abstract: This paper tells the stories of Chinese contract labour in the Pacific Islands from late in the eighteenth century, when John Meares first took Chinese tradesmen to Vancouver Island to establish a fur station, to the end of the nineteenth century. The sugar industry in Hawai‘i used Chinese labour throughout the second half of the nineteenth century, as did the Peruvian guano mines on the Chincha Islands, 1854–1880, where conditions were extremely bad. Stewart’s cotton plantation on Tahiti employed Chinese contract labour, 1865–1872, and the German colony of New Guinea, 1891–1903. Only two of these schemes (in Peru and Tahiti) led to permanent Chinese settlement, although contract labour in the early twentieth century also produced Chinese communities in Nauru and Western Samoa.

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Title: Preferential trade or strong institutions : promoting sustainable development in Fiji

Author: Szmedra, Philip
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.27 no.2, 2004
Collation:

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

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Title: Wise, humane and sagacious : a tribute to Dorothy Shineberg (1927-2004)

Author: Munro, Doug
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.27 no.2, 2004
Collation: p. 277 -282

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: A kind of mending : restorative justice in the Pacific Island

Author: Corrin Care, Jennifer
Subject:  Restorative justice|Pacific Area
 Social science|Anthropology|Cultural
Volume: Vol.27 no.2, 2004
Collation: p. 298-302

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

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Title: When perceptions of the past obscure the future : postcolonial transformations and political conflict in Oceania

Author: Robertson, Robbie
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.27 no.2, 2004
Collation: p. 294-297

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Pigs, mats and feathers : customary marriage in Vanuatu

Author: Farran, Sue
Subject:  Vanuatu marriage law|custom marriage
Volume: Vol.27 no.2, 2004
Collation:

Abstract: Republic of Vanuatu law recognises three forms of marriage as valid: church, civil and custom. This paper reports on a preliminary survey to determine what forms of custom (kastom) marriage exist in Vanuatu and whether they are certain enough to establish that a marriage has taken place. The survey compiled information on procedures, participants, the role of property and the incorporation of civil or religious elements into the kastom form. It is apparent that the forms of kastom marriage, while varied, follow recognised procedural steps, most of which must be followed to validate the marriage. They are generally preceded by formal premarital negotiations. They usually involve negotiated property exchanges and transfer the bride from her own family’s home to her husband’s house. Preparations, the ceremony and the celebrations involve large groups of kin of both sexes, from both sides, providing many witnesses to the marriage. Persons of particular status, e.g. chiefs, may also play a significant role. The property exchange signifies the establishment of strong and ongoing social relations between social/kin groups. Though the sample was small, the survey strongly suggests the existence of identifiable kastom marriages in recognisable forms and fulfilling important social functions. Their recognition under the law indeed seems appropriate.

Original information

Title: Fiji's women migrant workers and human rights : the case of nurses and teachers in the Republic of Marshall Islands

Author: Rokoduru, Avelina
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.27 no.2, 2004
Collation:

Abstract: Fiji’s international labour migration studies are dominated by research on skilled mobility to metropolitan countries. By way of countering this emphasis, this paper focuses on human rights issues affecting women migrant workers who for employment reasons have moved from Fiji Islands to the Marshall Islands, as an example of intra-Pacific labour migration. The paper examines four types of migrant rights—civil, social, political and industrial—and in particular, critiques the effectiveness of the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) regarding the rights of migrant women workers. The Fiji women nurses and teachers in the Marshall Islands are awarded all four types of rights. Nevertheless, the general lack of information and awareness of this type of protection, an absence of appropriate institutions and structures, and the non-ratification of CEDAW by the Marshall Islands government are barriers against the recognition and enjoyment of these rights. The paper concludes with issues, problems and solutions towards realisation of rights for Fiji’s women migrant workers.

Original information

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