JOURNAL OF PACIFIC STUDIES
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Vol.35 no.3, 2016(9)

Title: Internal migration in the Pacific Islands : a regional overview

Author: Naidu, Vijay, Vaike, Linda Flora
Subject:  Internal migration
 Urbanization
 Informal settlement
 Ethnic enclaves
Volume: Vol.35 no.3, 2016
Collation: p. 91-110

Abstract: Internal migration in the Pacific islands, especially in Melanesia has become more widespread and intense over the last 50 years. However, this movement of people from smaller ‘outer’ islands and interior regions of the larger islands to ‘main’ islands and coastal towns and cities is less documented, and studied when compared to international migration from Pacific Island Countries PICs). This paper seeks to provide an overview of internal migration in PICs using the apparently contradictory standpoints of urban bias theory, and new economic geography as well as by using historical and contemporary information to provide the context of current internal migration trends. It is shown that there are significant gaps in the provision of statistics relating to both inter-provincial migration and urbanization, particularly with regards to gendered information. The paper maintains that with modernization there has been on-going improvement in girls and women’s access to education, and opportunities of employment in the formal sector. As both higher educational and employment opportunities are primarily found in urban areas, the previously male dominated migration patterns are being replaced by movements that exhibit greater gender parity.

Original information

Title: Oceanian journeys and sojourns : home thoughts abroad

Author: Torre, Andreea R.
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.35 no.3, 2016
Collation: p. 133-136

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Climate change and migration : the case of the Pacific Islands and Australia

Author: Ash, Jillian, Campbell, Jillian
Subject:  Migration
 Climate change adaptation
Volume: Vol.35 no.3, 2016
Collation: p. 53-71

Abstract: There is growing consensus that voluntary labour migration can promote economic development in migrant sending and receiving countries and can be a positive adaptive response to the effects of climate change. However, for voluntary migration to be a positive form of adaptation, policy commitment and collaboration between migrant sending and receiving countries will be required. In the Pacific, Australia has capacity to collaborate with Pacific Island governments to facilitate voluntary migration; however, Australia has been reluctant to expand migration access to the Pacific.This article makes the case for promoting migration opportunities between Australia and the Pacific as part of the adaptive strategy efforts.

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Title: Migration, gender and politics of development in Pacific Islands : an introduction to the Special Issue

Author: Cangiano, Alessio, Torre, Andreea R.
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.35 no.3, 2016
Collation: p. 5-20

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Australian refugee policy and its impacts on Pacific Island countries

Author: Opeskin, Brian, Ghezelbash, Daniel
Subject:  Asylum seekers
 Immigration detention
Volume: Vol.35 no.3, 2016
Collation: p. 73-90

Abstract: Refugees present an immense challenge globally but until recently Pacific Island Countries (PICs) have been relatively sheltered from this phenomenon. However, changes to Australia’s border security and refugee policies in recent years have significant implications for the Pacific because of Australia’s determination to prevent asylum seekers from arriving by boat in Australian territory. This article examines Australia’s so-called ‘Pacific Solution’, which entails the transfer of asylum seekers to camps in Nauru and Papua New Guinea, where they are detained pending determination of their refugee status and ultimate resettlement. The social impacts of Australia’s policies include the heightened tensions that arise from establishing large detention facilities in small island communities, and the social costs of resettling persons who are found to be refugees among poor local populations. Australia’s policies also have other impacts on PICs. Australia’s selective allocation of foreign aid and other funds make PICs vulnerable to pressure from its developed neighbour, and create the danger that Australia’s perceived ‘problem’ with unauthorised boat arrivals is being shifted to acquiescent countries in the Pacific.

Original information

Title: Review of the New Pacific Diplomacy

Author: Nicole, Robert
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.35 no.3, 2016
Collation: p. 127-131

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Pacific migration futures : ancient solutions to contemporary and prospective challenges?

Author: Bedford, Richard Dodgshun
Subject:  Pacific integration
 International migration
Volume: Vol.35 no.3, 2016
Collation: p. 111-126

Abstract: Scholarship published by staff and students at the University of the South Pacific has had a profound impact on understandings by researchers of both historical and contemporary transformations in Oceania. This paper contains some reflections by a geographer who has been researching population movement in the region since the mid-1960s. It begins by drawing attention to seminal writing by the late Epeli Hau’ofa in the 1980s and 1990s, and traces the impact of some of Hau’ofa’s messages about regional integration and identity in Oceania in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Reference is made to another very significant collection of essays by scholars, students, politicians and government officials linked with the USP in 2015 which explores what is being called ‘the new Pacific diplomacy’. Like the discourse generated by Waddell, Naidu and Hau’ofa’s (1993) A New Oceania: Rediscovering our Sea of Islands, ideas reported in Fry and Tarte’s (2015) The New Pacific Diplomacy have the potential to shift thinking about identities, regional co-operation and migration in Oceania.

Original information

Title: Uncertain belongings : relationships, money and returned migrant workers in Port Vila, Vanuatu

Author: Cummings, Margaret
Subject:  Migration
 Recognised Seasonal Employer
Volume: Vol.35 no.3, 2016
Collation: p. 21-33

Abstract: New Zealand’s Recognised Seasonal Employer (RSE) scheme allows Pacific islanders, including many from Vanuatu, to migrate as temporary agricultural labourers. For government stakeholders, the program’s success can be measured, in no uncertain terms, by the increased consumption of foreign goods and community development projects funded by returned migrants. Yet it is precisely in these terms, of new belongings and one’s sense of belonging, that returnees, especially young men, experience the greatest uncertainty. How should they use the money they earn overseas: to strengthen their kinship networks and communities by sharing their wealth, or to purchase clothes, stereos, cars, or even land, which will belong only to them as individuals? Each strategy has its potential promises and pitfalls, and the outcomes remain uncertain. Will workers who spend on belongings alienate themselves from their kin and island communities? And how might they be forging new kinds of belonging as young urban wage earners? In addition to exploring these questions, this paper suggests that these strategies might inform and inspire relevant policy that is able to better grapple with the very uncertainties the RSE helps to create.

Original information

Title: 'On the ship, you can do anything' : the impact of international cruiseship employment for i-Kiribati women

Author: Kagan, Sophia
Subject:  Temporary migration
 Women's empowerment
 Cruiseship employment
Volume: Vol.35 no.3, 2016
Collation: p. 34-51

Abstract: Kiribati is a remote, small island country with a long history of male temporary migration as a mechanism for relieving unemployment and facilitating remittances. This article looks at a unique case study of female i-Kiribati migration and is based on interviews with a small sample of i-Kiribati women who worked on international cruiseships between 2009-2012, thus providing interesting insight into first-time migration experiences of women from a remote island country. The findings suggest that while the experience did not generally lead to observable changes in their ability to manage remittances, nor in gender relations between husband and wife, employment on the ship did nonetheless have strong reported benefits in terms of independence, skills development and confidence of the women interviewed. These findings corroborate existing literature showing while entrenched gender norms rarely shift directly due to women’s migration experiences, migration does contribute to the women’s empowerment through increased agency and ability to make decisions, both during and after their migration.

Original information

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