JOURNAL OF PACIFIC STUDIES
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Vol.06, 1980(8)

Title: Volume 6, 1980 - Editor

Author:
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.06, 1980
Collation: p. 1

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: The state as entrepreneur : a case study of the government shareholding agency in Solomon Islands, it's origin and development

Author: Carroll, Peter
Subject:  Solomon Islands. Government Shareholding Agency
 Government business enterprises|Solomon Islands
 Corporations, Government|Solomon Islands
Volume: Vol.06, 1980
Collation: p. 45-86

Abstract: The majority of the countries of the South and West Pacific have achieved independence in the past two decades. Most of these very small countries have become accustomed to using publlic enterprise to promote economic growth more rapid than that which obtained under earlier colonial regimes. Before independence, publlic enterprise was not uncommon, particularly in the field of public utilities, and, to a lesser extent, in the financial sectors - as the several Agricultural and Industrial Loans Boards of the region indicate - but it was nowhere extensive. The loosening of colonial ties at the time of independence, however, sparked off a veritable explosion in its use. Governments, eager to speed up socio-economic growth but faced with relatively undeveloped private sectors, established public enterprises throughout their economies. As a result, one problem has been that of effective coordination and control. Most governments have chosen to place their various public enterprises under a relevant department, ultimately responsible, through ministers, to cabinet and parliament. The Fiji Sugar Corporation, Western Samoa Trust Estates Corporation, Tonga Commodities Board, and many others vital to the well-being of their respective national economies, are dealt in with in this fashion.

Original information

Title: On welfare losses when both quotas and tariffs are used to restrict imports

Author: Hazari, Bharat R.
Subject:  Foreign trade regulation|Fiji
 Import quotas|Fiji
Volume: Vol.06, 1980
Collation: p. 88-97

Abstract: The object of this not note is to analyse welfare losses when imports are restricted by the simultaneous use of both qoutas and tariffs. There exists at least two real life of where both types of restrictions are being applied to curtail the imports of foreign cars into the local market. In spite of the absencce of a local car producer the Fijian Government uses both a quotas and a tariff on imported cars. The Australian Government also uses both methods of protection - the foreign car makers are allowed to take up only 20% of the market and an import duty of 57% is also imposed. Unlike Fiji, the quotas are actioned in Australia and several models of cars are locally produced. This note analyses the welfare consequences of the above restrictions in a partial equilibrium framework. The analysis is carried out in diagrammatic terms.

Original information

Title: Villagers at war : some Papua New Guinean experiences in World War II

Author: Robinson, Neville K.
Subject:  World War, 1939-1945|Campaigns|Papua New Guinea
 Villages|Papua New Guinea
 Papua New Guinea|Social life and customs|20th century
Volume: Vol.06, 1980
Collation: p. 114-120

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Fiji Library Association Journal

Author: Robertson, Robbie
Subject:  Fiji Library Association|Periodicals
 Libraries|Fiji|Periodicals
 Libraries|Oceania|Periodicals
Volume: Vol.06, 1980
Collation: p. 121-122

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: That elusive 'other India'

Author: Lal, Brij V.
Subject:  East Indians|Foreign countries
 India|Emigration and immigration
Volume: Vol.06, 1980
Collation: p. 99-113

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Stones rot but words last forever : the influence of culture on the communication of developmental information in the Pacific Islands

Author: Thomas, Pamela M.
Subject:  Communication and culture|Samoa
 Samoa|social life and customs
Volume: Vol.06, 1980
Collation: p. [1]-34

Abstract: E pala ma 'a, 'ae 'uppu (stones rot but words last forever). This old Samoan proverb points to the cultural significance of the spoken word in Samoan society. It alludes not only to the enduring nature of myths and legends and the importance of orally transmitted geneologies and history, but to the richness and pleasure of good discussion, pride in the ability to talk well and the Samoans' skill in oratory. Samoa has a talking culture, and oratory is regarded as an art form. The importance of the spoken word is clearly shown in a special category of chief - the 'tulafale' or talking chief. As in many Pacific societies based on an oral culture, the spoken word is more than just a means of communication, it is central to the way of life.

Original information

Title: Volume 6, 1980 - Contents

Author:
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.06, 1980
Collation: p. 1

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

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