JOURNAL OF PACIFIC STUDIES
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Vol.09, 1983(10)

Title: Accounting : a first world system in a third world society

Author: Lyons, L., White, M., Naughton, A.
Subject:  Accounting|Oceania
Volume: Vol.09, 1983
Collation: p. 285-299

Abstract: It is quite common for accountants, practitioners and academics alike to become so absorbed in the specific nature of each task that confronts us that we easily lose sight of the overall role that the accountancy profession should play. This is a tendency that must be countered if accounting is to make the best contribution possible to the development of society's welfare. Accounting involves itself in reporting to entities of different types in different ways.

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Title: Geography.......the next most important subject

Author: Forster, J.J.H., Bryant, J.J., Thaman, R.R.
Subject:  Geography|Oceania|History
Volume: Vol.09, 1983
Collation: p. 133-179

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Political science in the South Pacific : a survey of the literature and an agenda of what needs to be done

Author: Premdas, Ralph R.
Subject:  Political science|Oceania|History
Volume: Vol.09, 1983
Collation: p. 172-217

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

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Title: Towards a review of history in the South Pacific

Author: Leckie, Jacqueline
Subject:  Oceania|Historiography
Volume: Vol.09, 1983
Collation: p. 9-69

Abstract: On occasion Pacific historians have taken a break from the enthusiasm with which they pursue either the collection and interpretation of minutiae or the grand task of generalisation to address themselves to the nature of Pacific history and the direction in which this ever increasing collection of historical information can or should be heading. Some of the founding fathers in Pacific history have made their views known on the subject, notably J.W. Davidson (1966) and H.E. Maude (1971). While such writings have raised a number of issues pertinent to the srudy of Pacific history, they have failed to provide anything approaching a critical evaluation of the patterns and possible directions in the field. This is equally true of younger historians. Perhaps this is because Pacific historians, the majority of whom received their training at the Department of Pacific History at the Australian National University set up by Davidson, on the whole have been reluctant to break away from the tutelage of their old masters. Of course the scope for criticism of the direction of Pacific history has never been entirely closed, as indicated by Oskar Spate (1978) in the festschrift dedicated to Maude. Spate pointed to a need for a wider perspective in the study of Pacific history, which he suggested be refferred to as `Oceanic history. While Davidson himself was not immune to this approach, it would seem that much of the research and writing under his direction lost sight of this goal.

Original information

Title: Sociology in the South Pacific

Author: Howard, Michael C.
Subject:  Anthropology|Oceania|History
 Sociology|Oceania|History
Volume: Vol.09, 1983
Collation: p.70-132

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Volume 9, 1983 - Contents

Author:
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.09, 1983
Collation:

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Administration and development in the South Pacific : perspective and problem areas

Author: Dubsky, Roman
Subject:  Public administration|Research|Oceania
Volume: Vol.09, 1983
Collation: p. 262-284

Abstract: Administration as a field of theory and practice has increasingly moved in anew direction and new direction in the South Pacific. It is the aim of this study to identify this direction and examined the nature of changed that has occured in this field from the early 1970's onward. Experienced in the region, like recent experienced in other developing areas, indicates considerable change in the nature of administrative systems and problems as a result of commitment of Pacific state to accelerated development. There has been, for exaple a vast extension in the activities of public institutions and similarly private organisations have assumed a growing importance in the context of development. Increasingly, the influence of advanced technology has made itself felt, affecting administrative practice. Such major changes in Pacific administrative systems both public and private, call for an appraisal of these systems as they are at present. This involves attempts to identify the new trends in administrative thought and practive and to redefine the role of adminstrative studies in the light of changing social and political conditions.

Original information

Title: Social scientists in paradise

Author: Howard, Michael C.
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.09, 1983
Collation: p. 1-8

Abstract: Social science research in the South Pacific has had its ups and downs. depending on the vagaries of the world economy, wars and other geo-political considerations, academic fads, and the like. By and large, however, it can be argued that it has progressed - at least in terms of specialised complexity, the quantity of research and writing, and the range of theoretical perspectives represented. The South Pacific is no longer the preserve of a handful of anthropologists studying kinship and sexual practices and historians recording the glories of imperial expansion. The heterogeneity of social science research in the region has increased significantly over the past couple of decades. As a result, there are those who now feel that social science in the South Pacific has begun to exhibit a higher level of maturity, who believe that it is on the verge of moving beyond simple description, vaguely informed by theoretical concerns, to a more sophisticated plane. The articles in this special issue of the The Journal of Pacific Studies are drawn from the major fields within social science like history, anthropology, and geography, and to a lesser extent political sciences and economics, which have been present in the region over the years as well as from such relatively new fields of study as accounting, administration, and industrial relations.

Original information

Title: The state of economic development theory in the South Pacific

Author: Gunasekera, H. M.
Subject:  Economic development|Research|Oceania
Volume: Vol.09, 1983
Collation: p. 218-261

Abstract: This paper is an attempt to review the literature on economic development in the South Pacific written during the past decade and a half. The paper is based on an examination of over one hundred and fifty pieces and reports. The list perused is by no means exhaustive, the authors' input in this regard being constrained by their imperfect knowledge of and accessibility to existing works and by the limited time available. Naturally, we have not been able to make individual mention of all the works examined. In this task we have not been compelled to be selective, not only by the limitation of space but also by the fact that our main concern has been to classify these writings in terms of a certain set of series of development. Hence, those writings which we considered as forming only detailed aspects of these series have been mentioned only in passing.

Original information

Title: Industrial relations in the South Pacific

Author: Chand, Anand
Subject:  Industrial relations|Oceania
 Labor unions|Oceania
Volume: Vol.09, 1983
Collation: p. 300-316

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

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