JOURNAL OF PACIFIC STUDIES

Title: Ta Kupesi : emerging themes and methodologies from educational research in Tonga

Author: Coxon, Eve
Subject:  Education|Tonga
 Education|Research|Tonga
Volume: Vol.30, 2007
Collation: p. 171

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

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Title: Teachers as agents of schooling and development in the South Pacific

Author: Sullivan, Terence J.
Subject:  Teachers and community|Oceania
 Oceania|Economic conditions
Volume: Vol.22, 1998
Collation: p. 121-132

Abstract: Teachers, as members of a noble profession, have a twofold obligation: to contribute to the learning of the children under their care and to serve the community in its efforts to achieve its development objectives. This paper is based on the premise that these two roles are complementary rather than conflicting.

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Title: Teaching in different times : Solomon Island teachers' narrative of perseverance

Author: Burnett, Greg, Dorovolomo, Jeremy
Subject:  Education|Oceania
Volume: Vol.30, 2007
Collation: p. 37-62

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

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Title: Television advertising and viewers' attitude : a comparative study of Fiji and India

Author: Singh, Gurmeet, Gautam, Harish
Subject:  Advertising
 Consumer behaviour
Volume: Vol.32 no.2, 2012
Collation: p. 70-86

Abstract: This study reports the results qf a survey conducted on IV VMwerS qf India and Fiji to compare Iww positWe consumer attitude is towards IV adJiertising in these two different geographical locations. The study finds that consumers' interest in watching IV Iws declined wlwn compared with past levels. But those who watch IV appreciate the sense qf hwnour in adJiertisements and they find the advertisements slwwn on IV entertoining. Some qf the respondents were qf the view that they like to watch advertisements not.fOr knowledge or information so much as for entertoinmenL The findings qf this research reveal that consumers in India and Fiji have positioe attitude towards IV adJiertising. The stut!Y also found that these is no significant difference in vim.vers' attitude towards IV adJiertising based on income, occupation, gender and education.

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Title: Tetee Atu : to hit or not to hit

Author: Fairbairn-Dunlop, Peggy
Subject:  Child abuse|Samoa|Prevention
Volume: Vol.25 no.2, 2001
Collation: p. 203-230

Abstract: The starting point for this paper is concern in Samoa that physical methods of discipline may contribute to the undesirable increase in violence of Samoan youth behaviour.

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Title: Texts and contexts : reflections in Pacific Islands historiography

Author: Hau'ofa, Barbara
Subject:  Islands of the Pacific|Historiography
Volume: Vol.30, 2007
Collation: p. 159-162

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

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Title: That elusive 'other India'

Author: Lal, Brij V.
Subject:  East Indians|Foreign countries
 India|Emigration and immigration
Volume: Vol.06, 1980
Collation: p. 99-113

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

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Title: A theory of trade and development of small vulnerable states

Author: Grynberg, Roman
Subject:  Investments, Foreign|Oceania
Volume: Vol.25 no.2, 2001
Collation: p. 155-172

Abstract: This paper seeks to draw together the common threads in the historical experiences oftrade and development ofthe small island states of the central and western Pacific.

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Title: 'They are digging their graves with their teeth' : mortality, poverty and nutrition in the Pacific

Author: Seniloli, Kesaia
Subject:  Poverty|Health aspects|Oceania
 Children|Oceania|Mortality
 Nutrition|Oceania
 Oceania|Mortality
Volume: Vol.28 no.2, 2005
Collation: p. 163-191

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

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Title: They came for doctrates

Author: Regan, Sean
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.03, 1977
Collation: p. 89-96

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

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Title: The 'three Fiji's' thesis : a critical examination of a ne-empiricist-naturalistic analysis of Fiji's polity

Author: Plange, Niik
Subject:  Ethnicity|Fiji
Volume: Vol.15, 1990
Collation: P. 16-31

Abstract: This thesis is a variation on the pol y-ethnic society theme where observa ble ethnic or' racial' ca tegories - in Fiji's case, European, Fijian and Indian - provide the p.rimary units for explaining Fiji's socio-economic and political developments and crises.

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Title: The Tonga Growers Federation Inc. : a case study of a relationship between worker and farmer unions

Author: Hince, Kevin
Subject:  Agricultural laborers|Labor Unions|Tonga
 Tonga Growers Federation Inc
Volume: Vol.24 no.1, 2000
Collation: p. 33-50

Abstract: The formation of the Tonga Growers Federation, examined in this case study, exemplifies two apparent contradictions: a seemingly anomalous juxtaposition of educated elite/intellectuals and small holder squash farmers in the struggle to organise, and an equally paradoxical alliance of labour unions and a farmers’ union.

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Title: Tonga : in search of the Friendly Islands

Author: Robie, David
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.31 no.2, 2011
Collation: p. 301-304

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

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Title: The Tongan model : adapting a community health development approach to the Tongan diaspora in urban New Zealand

Author: Ofanoa, Malakai, Raeburn, John
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.34 no.2, 2014
Collation: p. 5-18

Abstract: This paper discusses a participatory action research project conducted with Tongans living in Mangere, a suburb of Auckland, New Zealand. The primary aim of the research was to adapt a weI/proven New Zealand community development/ health promotion model to use with Tongans living in urban areas, so as to enable them to address the health and well-being issues affecting them in a positive way.

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Title: Tourism and Residents’ Quality of Life: a critical examination

Author: Matatolu, Ilisapeci
Subject:  Indigenous communities
 Tourism activities
Volume: Vol. 39, no. 1, 2019
Collation: p. 128-164

Abstract: This academic paper aims at increasing awareness and understanding of extant knowledge relating to empirical research undertaken on how residents’ quality of life (QOL) is impacted by tourism activities. The paper will deliberate related definitions, critically examine selected theoretical frameworks and main themes of extant empirical research in relation to tourism and residents’ QOL, with a focus on Pacific context. Strengths and weaknesses of selected theoretical frameworks discussed include social exchange theory, social representations theory and bottom up spillover theory. It also scrutinizes concepts related to how the actions of tourists and the activities of tourism businesses affect indigenous host communities in relation to impacts on residents’ QOL. It concludes with an overview of current limitations and future research opportunities encompassing tourism activities and residents’ QOL scholarship. Future research opportunities highlighted include an expansion of ontological and epistemological issues in relation to research related to resident atitudes to tourism and quality of life in indigenous communities.

Original information

Title: Tourism Development in the South Pacific: the cases of Nauru and Tuvalu

Author: Towner, Nick, Taumoepeau, Semisi
Subject:  Climate change
 SWOT analysis
Volume: Vol. 39, no. 1, 2019
Collation: p. 52-72

Abstract: Tuvalu and Nauru are isolated developing island nations located in the South Pacific Ocean. In contrast to the established larger Pacific destinations such as Fiji and Tahiti, the tourism industries on both Tuvalu and Nauru are in their infancy. Tourism development in these remote island nations faces a myriad of challenges which include a lack of infrastructure, environmental susceptibility, economic vulnerability, difficulties with access and considerable distances from major tourist markets. This paper reviews tourism on Tuvalu and Nauru and evaluates their current situation regarding potential tourism development through workshops with relevant stakeholders, surveys and subsequent SWOT analysis. The results of the paper outlined a large number of challenges faced by Tuvalu and Nauru due to their geographic location but also highlighted that both Islands possess fascinating and unique features that have the potential to attract niche tourism markets. A key finding of this paper is that the tourism stimulus or potential attraction can also be the chief threat to the islands’ economic survival hence the two edges of the sword. Further research is required to assess the effect of the withdrawal of the Refugee Processing Centre on Nauru’s economy and to evaluate the impact of climate change on Tuvalu’s society and potential adaption strategies.

Original information

Title: Toward a theoretical framework for educational aid and teacher education within the Pacific region

Author: Burnett, Greg
Subject:  Aid
 Consultancy
 Education
Volume: Vol.38 no.1, 2018
Collation: p. 5-22

Abstract: Educational aid projects delivered into the Pacific region from a rim country such as Australia are commonly informed by a range of competing discourses including: altruism, need, self-interest and accountability.

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Title: Towards a history of tourism in Solomon Islands : the first instalment

Author: Douglas, Ngaire
Subject:  Solomon Islands|Tourism history|Melanesia|Burns Philp
Volume: Vol.26 no.1&2, 2004
Collation: p. 29-50

Abstract: Researchers of tourism histories have mainly focused on documenting the process as it has happened in the Western world. It is suggested that this is because the academic study of tourism has traditionally been a Western discipline. This paper initiates the documentation of the historical development of tourism in Solomon Islands, a small island country in the Southwest Pacific. The British colonial experience and the proximity of Solomon Islands to Australia have both been strong influences on the directions tourism has taken throughout the last century— for better and for worse. The construction of this tourism history indicates the diversity of sources that researchers must consult in order to pull together the disparate threads of the story.

Original information

Title: Towards a review of history in the South Pacific

Author: Leckie, Jacqueline
Subject:  Oceania|Historiography
Volume: Vol.09, 1983
Collation: p. 9-69

Abstract: On occasion Pacific historians have taken a break from the enthusiasm with which they pursue either the collection and interpretation of minutiae or the grand task of generalisation to address themselves to the nature of Pacific history and the direction in which this ever increasing collection of historical information can or should be heading. Some of the founding fathers in Pacific history have made their views known on the subject, notably J.W. Davidson (1966) and H.E. Maude (1971). While such writings have raised a number of issues pertinent to the srudy of Pacific history, they have failed to provide anything approaching a critical evaluation of the patterns and possible directions in the field. This is equally true of younger historians. Perhaps this is because Pacific historians, the majority of whom received their training at the Department of Pacific History at the Australian National University set up by Davidson, on the whole have been reluctant to break away from the tutelage of their old masters. Of course the scope for criticism of the direction of Pacific history has never been entirely closed, as indicated by Oskar Spate (1978) in the festschrift dedicated to Maude. Spate pointed to a need for a wider perspective in the study of Pacific history, which he suggested be refferred to as `Oceanic history. While Davidson himself was not immune to this approach, it would seem that much of the research and writing under his direction lost sight of this goal.

Original information

Title: Towards pro-active legislatures and inclusive development in PICs

Author: Siddiqui, Kamal, Naidu, Vijay, Tarte, Sandra
Subject:  Economic crisis
 Legislatures
 Leadership
 Gender enpowerment
 Human development
Volume: Vol.31 no.1, 2011
Collation: p. 1-12

Abstract: This paper is based on the assumption that proactive legislatures in the Pacific Island countries (PICs) are central in ensuring that societal change and development are conducive to the well being of all their citizenry. It provides a contextual backdrop of the consequences for PICs of the global economic crisis and the lethargy of legislatures in responding to the crisis. Hitherto, legislatures have tended not to meet frequently and the meetings did not cover sufficient time to address serious issues and policies adequately. As a result of historical precedents and existing political structures, the executive branch of government has taken the lead in policy formulation and law making. Legislatures have generally failed to provide the scrutiny required for accountability and transparency. Pacific legislatures have also been largely unrepresentative of women and youth. This paper highlights a number of significant shortcomings of legislatures in PICs and recommends measures that will make them more representative and responsive, thereby contributing to the human development of island peoples.

Original information

Title: Trade liberalisation in the post-cold war era and its implications for the Fiji Sugar Industry

Author: Grynberg, Roman
Subject:  Sugar trade|Fiji
Volume: Vol.17, 1993
Collation: p. 132-160

Abstract: This paper considers the prognosis for the Fiji sugar industry in the post-cold war era.

Original information

Title: Trade's impacts on production efficiency and technology in Pacific Island countries

Author: Chen, Hong, Prasad, Biman Chand
Subject:  Singh, Baljeet
Volume: Vol.35 no.3, 2015
Collation: p. 56-78

Abstract: Pacific Island countries have relatively high level of openness measured by the trade-to-GDP ratio; yet they are faced with the difficulty of making progress in economic development. This raises the concern whether trade works effectively to enhance economic growth in PICs. Answer to this question is particularly important since these countries have limited domestic sources to boost economic growth. This study aims to provide an answer to the above question by assessing exports and imports’ impacts on production efficiency and technology. The non-parametric data envelopment analysis approach is employed to calculate efficiency and technology levels for seven Pacific Island countries over 1970-2009; this is followed by panel regression analyses to assess trade’s impacts on production efficiency and technology in these countries.

Original information

Title: Trading preferentially and protection : is it good for Pacific Islands countries?

Author: Gounder, Neelesh, Prasad, Biman Chand
Subject:  Trade policy
 International trade
Volume: Vol.32, 2012
Collation: p. 57-64

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) and biodiversity conservation : strengthening community-based approaches (CBA) to conservation and building equitable partnerships in practice with indigenous peoples of Costa Rica

Author: Orcherton, Dan
Subject:  Traditional ecological knowledge
 Biodiversity conservation
Volume: Vol.32, 2012
Collation: p. 83-98

Abstract: Traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) is important in preserving and conserving biocultural diversity. The paper draws on data from 20 case-study farms and communities in the Talamanca Indigenous Reserve of south-eastern Costa Rica. The BriBri and Cabecar indigenous groups preserve and conserve biocultural diversity on the basis of their abilities to maintain traditional roles and responsibilities; and successfully build equitable research relationships by conserving biocultural diversity on the basis of their abilities to build research relationships with community leaders and decision makers. Loss of TEK, however, is attendant on declining roles and responsibilities of elders, acculturation of valley populations, pressure of external market influences and socioeconomic drivers, which reduce their adaptive capacity. Indigenous agroforestry practices have persevered, continuing to shape the biodiversity of their farming systems through decisions affecting sociocultural processes and land-use, by making effective use of all available TEK.

Original information

Title: Traditional Indian folk drama in Fiji

Author: Pillai, Raymond
Subject:  Folk drama, Indic|Fiji
Volume: Vol.05, 1979
Collation: p. 23-33

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: A tradition Hawaiian expression re-examined

Author: Hau'ofa, Epeli, Thaman, Konai, Wendt, Albert
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.10, 1984
Collation: p. 91-109

Abstract: John Charlot's comment that the sense of the term Manawa, as breath is no longer current may be true only for Hawaiian. Other Polynesian languages, such as Tongan and Samoan, have several meanings for the term. In Tongan and Samoan the word Manava is used in several ways. As Charlot noted manava means breath or to breath. He did not note, however, that manava, on the other hand, means belly, stomach or womb. Thus the difference in meaning is in the intonation of the word and not in its written form. Manava may also be broken into Mana and Va. Mana is a concept common to all Polynesian cultures and means power, essence of power, or creative essence.

Original information

Title: A tradition Hawaiian expression re-examined

Author: Charlot, John
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.10, 1984
Collation: p. 85-90

Abstract: Traditional Polynesian literature regularly uses words and senses of words that are no longer current. An understanding of them is naturally important for literally and linguistic studies. When oral informants are lacking, the meanings or senses of words must be induced from parallels and cognates.

Original information

Title: Transcend Pacific/Oceania : a philosophy and network for peace by peaceful means

Author: Bryar, Tim, Blancard, Lynda-Ann
Subject:  Conflict management|Oceania
 Peace building|Oceania
Volume: Vol.31 no.2, 2011
Collation: p. 197-210

Abstract: Conflict in the Pacific/Oceania region is complex, with multiple fault lines present that reflect ongoing structural and cultural violence, including social and economic class, gender and generational issues that marginalise youth. Approaches to dealing with conflict are many and varied. This article briefly discusses one approach to dealing with conflict, the TRANSCEND approach to peaceful conflict transformation (Galtung 1999), and how it may strengthen non-violent conflict transformation across the region. TRANSCEND is at once a philosophy of peace and one way of enacting peace. As a philosophy, TRANSCEND is an approach to transforming conflicts in a non-violent way. As a way of enacting peace, TRANSCEND is a peace and development network for conflict transformation by peaceful means. The paper concludes with some possible starting points for a TRANSCEND peace and development network in the Pacific/Oceania region.

Original information

Title: The traveller and the island belle : Frank Burnett's photography in the Pacific

Author: Mayer, Carol E.
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.29 no.2, 2006
Collation: p. 217-242

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Twice migrants' relationship to their ancestral homeland : the case of Indo-Fijians and India

Author: Voigt-Graf, Carmen
Subject:  Fiji Indians|Indian diospora
Volume: Vol.27 no.2, 2004
Collation:

Abstract: This article investigates the relationships of Indo-Fijians to their ancestral homeland, both in Fiji and following their secondary migration to Australia. Most Indo-Fijians are descendants of indentured labourers to Fiji. The majority have long ago lost all personal contacts with India. During their stay in Fiji, their social, cultural and religious practices have undergone many changes. Their experiences with subcontinental Indians are limited and their views of India and of subcontinental Indians largely based on ignorance, indifference and stereotypes. Recent efforts of the Indian Government at fostering relations with its 20 million strong diaspora are aimed primarily at wealthy Indian migrants in the West and descendants of indentured Indians have attracted comparatively little interest in India. Many Indo-Fijians have left Fiji and resettled in the developed Pacific Rim countries, especially Australia. In the wake of this secondary migration, Indo-Fijians have realised that their social and cultural distance from subcontinental Indians is too great to be narrowed by a shared ethnicity. In the process, they have developed a Pacific identity.

Original information

Title: Two Tahitian villages : a study in comparisons

Author: James, Kerry
Subject:  Ethnology|French Polynesia|Society Islands
 Economic anthropology|French Polynesia|Society Islands
 Society Islands (French Polynesia)|Economic conditions
 Society Islands (French Polynesia)|Social life and customs
 Tahiti|Economic conditions
 Tahiti|Social life and customs
 French Polynesia|Economic conditions
 French Polynesia|Social life and customs
Volume: Vol.10, 1984
Collation: p. 110-113

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Typoons in Micronesia : the history of tropical cyclones and their effects until 1914

Author: Ballendorf, Dirk Anthony
Subject:  Typhoons|Micronesia
Volume: Vol.28 no.2, 2005
Collation: p. 370-372

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

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