JOURNAL OF PACIFIC STUDIES

Title: Carbon footprinting and mitigation strategies for the USP Marine Campus

Author: Mani, Jeannette...(et al.)
Subject:  Carbon footprint
 Greenhouse gases
 Renewable energy
 Sustainability
Volume: Vol.38 no.1, 2018
Collation: p. 39-71

Abstract: The quest for a low carbon footprint (CF) has prompted many institutions around the world, such as universities, among others, to take stock of their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The CF assessment and its reporting are seen as a first step towards sustainability through planning for anthropogenic carbon emissions reduction. Carbon emissions–related activities of The University of the South Pacific (USP) Marine Campus) were investigated and then evaluated for potential reduction opportunities.

Original information

Title: A case for integrity in development assistance partnerships

Author: Sanga, Kabini F
Subject:  Economic assistance|Oceania
 Economic development projects|Oceania|Evaluation
Volume: Vol.25 no.2, 2001
Collation: p. 231-251

Abstract: A donor-driven search for partnership model must be preceded by a critical examination of the histories of previous partnerships in the Islands.

Original information

Title: The causes and consequences of cane burning in Fiji's sugar belt

Author: Davies, John
Subject:  Sugarcane|Harvesting|Fiji
 Burning of land|Fiji
Volume: Vol.22, 1998
Collation: p. 1-25

Abstract: The paper will summarise the organisation of sugar production in Fiji, as it is not possible to understand the motives for burning without being aware of the industry’s unique institutional structure.

Original information

Title: Challenges of autonomy in Papua New Guinea's autonomous region of Bougainville

Author: Wolfers, Edward P.
Subject:  Challenges
 Autonomy
Volume: Vol.30, 2007
Collation: p. 1-22

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Changes in teachers' world of work in a developing context : the case of Solomon Islands

Author: Lingam, Govinda Ishwar, Lingam, Narsamma
Subject:  Teachers|Training of.
Volume: Vol.34 no.2, 2014
Collation: p. 109-128

Abstract: This study explores the perceived magnitude of changes that have occurred in teachers ' world of work in the Solomon Islands.

Original information

Title: The changing Pacific : essays in honor of H.E. Maude ; edited by Niel Gunson

Author: Routledge, David
Subject:  Oceania|history
 Oceania|social life and customs
Volume: Vol.04, 1978
Collation: p. 89-94

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Chiefs of industry : Maori tribal enterprise in early colonial New Zealand : book review

Author: Campbell, Ian
Subject:  Maori (New Zealand people)|Commerce|History
 Maori (New Zealand people)|Economic conditions|19th century
Volume: Vol.30, 2007
Collation: p. 168-170

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: China's economic rebalancing amid global financial crisis : implications for the Pacific Island countries

Author: Yao, Shunli, Prasad, Biman , Xu, Meng
Subject:  China|Foreign economic relations|Developing countries
 China|Foreign relations|Developing countries
 Developing countries|Foreign economic relations|China
 Developing countries|Foreign relations|China
Volume: Vol.33 no.1, 2013
Collation: p. 44-61

Abstract: This paper reviews China's response to the 2008 financial crisis and the new growth model from the perspective of its entire reform era

Original information

Title: The Chinese are coming - is Fiji ready? : a study of Chinese tourists to Fiji

Author: Vada, Sera Kogure
Subject:  Chinese outbound tourism
 Tourism
Volume: Vol.35 no.3, 2015
Collation: p. 145-167

Abstract: Many tourism destinations are diversifying to new markets, and specifically to the Chinese outbound market to sustain their tourism industry. China has also been the fastest growing emerging market for Fiji. However, China is not a homogenous market. Their motivations and expectations differ from people from Western countries or even those from other parts of Asia. There has been limited research carried out on the Chinese outbound tourists to Pacific Island Countries. This study employed a survey questionnaire to 149 Chinese visitors to Fiji to identify the socio-demographics of Chinese visitors to Fiji and to assess their perceptions of Fiji as a tourist destination following their visit. The results provided a basic understanding of the profile of the Chinese tourist to Fiji in terms of their gender, marital status, education, residence, previous outbound experience, destination attributes and perceptions of their visit to Fiji.

Original information

Title: Chinese contract labour in the Pacific Islands during the nineteenth century

Author: Willmott, Bill
Subject:  Chinese contract labour; contract labour, Pacific|contract labour|nineteenth century
Volume: Vol.27 no.2, 2004
Collation:

Abstract: This paper tells the stories of Chinese contract labour in the Pacific Islands from late in the eighteenth century, when John Meares first took Chinese tradesmen to Vancouver Island to establish a fur station, to the end of the nineteenth century. The sugar industry in Hawai‘i used Chinese labour throughout the second half of the nineteenth century, as did the Peruvian guano mines on the Chincha Islands, 1854–1880, where conditions were extremely bad. Stewart’s cotton plantation on Tahiti employed Chinese contract labour, 1865–1872, and the German colony of New Guinea, 1891–1903. Only two of these schemes (in Peru and Tahiti) led to permanent Chinese settlement, although contract labour in the early twentieth century also produced Chinese communities in Nauru and Western Samoa.

Original information

Title: The 'clan vote' in Papua New Guinea open electorates : data from Angoram

Author: May, RJ
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.29 no.1, 2006
Collation: p. 108-129

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Climate and environmental change and food security : some conceptual considerations

Author: Weber, Eberhard
Subject:  Environmental Change and Security Program
 Food security
Volume: Vol.32, 2012
Collation: p. 99-110

Abstract: For many years issues of climate and environmental change have been mainly seen from a perspective of mitigation : what can we do to prevent climate and environmental change from happening? But the major questions, ever since the scientific community acknowledged that climate change is real, have now changed fundamentally. Today’s major concerns are: how can societies adjust, adapt to or at least cope with the impacts arising from climate and environmental change? Research on climate and environmental change and the impact on food and livelihood security needs to incorporate these changes. This not only has to do with changing perspectives about climate change, biodiversity conservation and environmental research; it also has to acknowledge emerging new paradigms in the field of food and livelihood security research that have been developed over the past 30 years, and that have much relevance for Pacific Island countries.

Original information

Title: Climate change and migration : the case of the Pacific Islands and Australia

Author: Ash, Jillian, Campbell, Jillian
Subject:  Migration
 Climate change adaptation
Volume: Vol.35 no.3, 2016
Collation: p. 53-71

Abstract: There is growing consensus that voluntary labour migration can promote economic development in migrant sending and receiving countries and can be a positive adaptive response to the effects of climate change. However, for voluntary migration to be a positive form of adaptation, policy commitment and collaboration between migrant sending and receiving countries will be required. In the Pacific, Australia has capacity to collaborate with Pacific Island governments to facilitate voluntary migration; however, Australia has been reluctant to expand migration access to the Pacific.This article makes the case for promoting migration opportunities between Australia and the Pacific as part of the adaptive strategy efforts.

Original information

Title: Climate change and renewable energy implications for the Pacific Islands of a global perspective

Author: Weir, Tony
Subject:  Renewable energy
 Renewable energy sources|Pacific Area
 Climate change mitigation|Islands of the Pacific
Volume: Vol.32 no.2, 2012
Collation: p. 4-30

Abstract: The 2007 Assessment Repori if the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) implies that to avoid dangerous climate change it will be necessary to hold temperature rises to kss tIum about 2 DC above pre-imlustrial values. To achieve this goal will require gblbal greenhouse gas emissions to be 50% to 80% lower in 2050 tIum in 2000, aruf to begin declining i!Y 2015. Ibis is a nugor challenge to the world. ConsequentlY, the IPCC pablishd in 2011 a Special Repori on &newabt. Energy, which reviewed the state if the art, the current status aruf the technical potential if each if the main renewabt. energy (RE) teehnoblg!£.<, aruf thus the feasibilitY aruf cost if meeting these climate change targets through much increased use if RE. 1his paper outlines some ~ foulings if that Special Report, and their implications for the Pacific Islands. It concluct.s that the required gblbal increase in RE in plm;e if fossil.foels is technicaf!y aruf economicaf!y possibl4 especiallY if coupt.d with increases in ifJicienry if energy us~ But it will require signijicant investmen~ substantial institutional aruf social chang~ aruf the political will to drive such clumge. Such changes in the gblbal energy ~stem wouldflow through to Pacific Islnnd countms in the.form ifblwering the cost to them ifrenewabt. energy teehnolog!£.< aruf would bring benffits in terms if environmental aruf economic security. Nevertkekss, some.fortker climate change is inevitable, aruf the Pacific Islands will still need to adapt to more severe climate extremes. !l.cent resenrch suggests that without a rapid reduction if gblbal greenhouse gas emissions, the atoll countms if the region 1ll'!)' become II1Iinhnbitabt. i!Y about 2040 because if salt-water inwufation. TheJounwl. <

Original information

Title: Climate-induced disaster, urban flooding and human security in Pacific towns and cities

Author: Mohanty, Mahoranjan
Subject:  Climate–induced disaster
 Human security
 Urban flooding
Volume: Vol.35 no.3, 2015
Collation: p. 5-27

Abstract: Climate change, a consequence of global bio-physical changes, is a challenge to humankind. Flood is the most frequently occurring event among the climate-induced disasters and increasing in intensity in Pacific cities. The purpose of the paper is to bring out the linkages between climate-induced disasters, urban flooding and human security. It examines the causes and occurrence of flooding in Pacific cities and assesses the extent of economic loss due to recent flooding especially in the urban areas in Fiji and also explores flooding implications to food, water and human security. The paper also suggests some flood planning, and management measures in preventing urban floods in making a ‘safer’ city or town.

Original information

Title: Closure of an ecolodge : poor strategic management ?

Author: Dwyer, Larry , Kemp, Sharon
Subject:  Strategic management|Tourism|Fiji|Hospitality
Volume: Vol.26 no.1&2, 2004
Collation: p. 51-76

Abstract: This paper analyses activities relevant to strategy formulation and implementation in a tourism organisation. It defines and discusses the internal and external environments, both of which are relevant to managerial decision making to achieve organisation goals. Fiji’s Hidden Paradise, an ecolodge formerly operating on Vanua Levu, is used as a case study. There is a brief overview of the nature and scope of operations of Fiji’s Hidden Paradise, and an exploration of how far the failure of the business can be attributed to a lack of sound strategic management. Finally, the paper discusses the implications of the research for strategy formulation and implementation in tourism organisations generally.

Original information

Title: Clothing the Pacific, ed. Chloe Colchester

Author: Clare, Shamier
Subject:  Clothing and dress|Oceania
 Oceania|Colonial influence
Volume: Vol.27 no.1, 2004
Collation: p. 112-115

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Colonial capitalism and class formation in Fiji : a retrospective overview

Author: Plange, Niik
Subject:  Fiji|Social conditions
 Fiji|Economic conditions
Volume: Vol.11, 1985
Collation: p. 91-116

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Colonial legacies? : a study of received and adopted legislation applying in the University of the South Pacific region

Author: Care, Kemmofer Corrin
Subject:  Law|Oceania
 Law|Great Britain|Colonies
 Colonies|Law and legislation
Volume: Vol.21, 1997
Collation: p. 33-59

Abstract: When the island countries of the South Pacific moved towards independence (which is intended here to include self-governance), decisions concerning the laws under which they would operate had to be made.

Original information

Title: Common law at bay? : the scope and status of customary law regimes in the Pacific

Author: Powles, Guy
Subject:  Customary law|Oceania
Volume: Vol.21, 1997
Collation: p. [61] -82

Abstract: This paper will attempt to demonstrate the diversity and extent of the recognition and use of customary law in the context of the introduction of common law, while examining problems associated with customary law’s role and dimensions as a sub-system of the law of the state.

Original information

Title: A comparative study of stress amongst teachers of the western division in Fiji

Author: Ahsan, Mohammad
Subject:  Stress
 Gender
 Ethnicity
Volume: Vol.36 no.2, 2016
Collation: p. 124-135

Abstract: Stress is an unavoidable aspect of modern life and can have serious effects on one’s health and performance. There is an absence of empirical research and literature regarding stress amongst teachers in Fiji. As such, there is an important need for basic research on teacher stress to be carried out in Fiji. The aim of this study was to investigate stress amongst school teachers.Fifty one teachers from the western division of Fiji were selected for this study. The Teacher Work Stress Inventory of G. J. Boyle et al. was used to measure teacher stress. Data was analysed using the IBM SPSS 21. Percentages, means, standard deviations, and t-test were used to describe the data. On the basis of data analysis, the study revealed that female, married, urban, i-Taukei, and secondary school teachers have more stress than their counter parts. It was also noted that all teachers at some point or the other experience different levels of stress, weather moderate, mild or extreme.

Original information

Title: Competition and regulation of mobile phones in small island nations

Author: Abbott, Malcolm, Chun-Wang, Wei
Subject:  competition|mobile phones|regulation|small islands|telecommunications.
Volume: Vol. 37 no.1, 2017
Collation: p. 32-60

Abstract: Small island nations face a number of challenges in achieving economic development. The small size of these nations means they lack the economic density required to take advantage of economies of scale and specialization, and the distance from larger markets raises transportation costs and limits their ability to be part of global production networks. In meeting these challenges the telecommunications industry has a vital role to play. Telecommunications reform has meant the introduction of competition into parts of the industry (mobile phone, long distance, and Internet). In this paper, the growth of mobile phone use is observed and analysed. The findings are that growth of the sector has taken place at a varied rate across the various nations studied, and that lower mobile phone prices are associated with more competition and independent regulation.

Original information

Title: Compliance of regulations in tuna fisheries in the Solomon Islands

Author: Mapuru, David, Naz, Rafia
Subject:  Tuna fisheries|Law and legislation|Solomon Islands
Volume: Vol.33 no.2, 2013
Collation: p. 77-94

Abstract: compliance of regulations in Tuna fisheries in the Solomon islands

Original information

Title: Conceptualising language in development : towards demystifying an epistemological paradox

Author: Gegeo, David Welchman, Watson-Gegeo, Karen Ann
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.33 no.2, 2013
Collation: p. 137-158

Abstract: Development in non-Anglo-European peripheral societies and minority communities continues to be dominated by an updated but resistant discourse of modernisation, and by the expectation that development depends on English

Original information

Title: Conference Review : Critical Tourism Studies – Asia Pacific, Yogyakarta, 3-6 March 2018

Author: Trupp, Alexander, Movono, Apisalome, Beckles, Lynn
Subject:  
Volume: Vol. 37 no.1, 2017
Collation: p. 84-90

Abstract: Critical Tourism Studies – Asia Pacific (CTS-AP) is an international network of scholars who share a vision of promoting social change in and through tourism practice, research and education (www.criticaltourismstudies.com). CTS seeks to find new ways of understanding and transforming travel and tourism by locating it in its wider political, economic, cultural and social contexts. CTS embodies “more than simply a way of knowing, an ontology, it is a way of being, a commitment to tourism inquiry which is pro-social justice, equality, and anti-oppression: it is an academy of hope’ (Ateljevic et al., 2007, p. 3). The first CTS conference was held in 2005, but the 2018 conference in Yogyakarta Indonesia was the first CTS conference that took place in the Asia Pacific Region. The region is characterized by its socioeconomic, cultural, and political diversity (Dolezal & Trupp, 2015) and is a mix of mature, emerging and nascent tourism destinations (Hall & Page, 2016; Pratt & Harrison, 2015). Pacific Island Countries – in contrast to many nations on the Asian mainland – have narrow economic bases and thus, limited choice but to seek further development of tourism (Cheer et al., 2018). Pacific Island Counties are well positioned to reap rewards from tourism investments, yet lack the critical lenses and experience (compared to Asia) required for planning and developing tourism sustainably (Movono, 2017). As such, the CTS movement and its communal networks ideally set itself as a hub for knowledge and information sharing which facilitates genuine exchanges on critical tourism issues that affect the Asia Pacific region.

Original information

Title: Conference review: International conference on sustainable alternatives to poverty reduction and ecological justice (SAPREJ-18), The University of the South Pacific, 26-29 June 2018,

Author: Weber, Eberhard
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.38 no.1, 2018
Collation: p. 121-126

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Confessions of a history addict

Author: Chappell, David A.
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.20, 1996
Collation: p. 213-223

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Conflict in the canefields : Fiji in 1921

Author: Ali, Ahmed
Subject:  Colonial Sugar Refining Company
 Sugar workers strike, Fiji, 1921
 Labor disputes|Fiji
 Strikes and lockouts|Fiji
Volume: Vol.05, 1979
Collation: p. 35-65

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: The 'conflict' model of pluralism : some evidence from Somosomo, Taveuni

Author: Naidu, Vijay
Subject:  Ethnic relations|Fiji|Somosomo
 Fiji|Race relations
Volume: Vol.03, 1977
Collation: p. 55-67

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Conflict reporting in the South Pacific, why peace journalism has a chance

Author: Robie, David
Subject:  Peace|Press coverage
 Journalism|political aspects
Volume: Vol.31 no.2, 2011
Collation: p. 221-240

Abstract: Peace journalism is hardly a new concept, Galtung and Ruge having provided a key conceptual underpinning in 1965 and in later studies. However, while it flourished significantly in parts of the globe in the 1990s, notably the Philippines, albeit frequently referred to there as ‘conflict-sensitive journalism’, it has only relatively recently become an approach seriously considered as applicable in a South Pacific context, especially in the wake of the Bougainville civil war and the Solomon Islands ethnic conflict. With other political upheavals such as four coups d’état in Fiji in two decades, paramilitary revolts in Vanuatu, riots in Tahiti and Tonga, protracted conflict in Papua New Guinea’s Highlands, and the pro-independence insurrection in New Caledonia in the 1980s, conflict resolution poses challenges for the region’s journalists and their education and training. Peace journalism is one approach that can arguably make sense of a region that has become increasingly complex, politically strained and violent, yet the concept is generally eschewed by mainstream media as a threat to the core values of ‘traditional journalism’ itself. This article examines conflict trends in the South Pacific, discusses the concept of peace journalism and argues that journalists can take a more constructive approach to reporting conflict in the region

Original information

Title: Confrontation in the Pacific : the Guam teachers' strike of 1981

Author: Ballendorf, Dirk Anthony
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.28 no.2, 2005
Collation: p. 376-377

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Congressional politics and congressional science

Author: Underwood, Robert A.
Subject:  Science|Social aspects
Volume: Vol.25 no.1, 2001
Collation: p. 113-121

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Constitutional development in the Solomon Islands

Author: Paia, Warren
Subject:  Constitutional history|Solomon Islands
 Solomon Islands|Politics and government|20th century
Volume: Vol.01, 1975
Collation:

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Consumerism, the media and malnutrition in the Pacific Islands

Author: Thaman, R.R.
Subject:  Malnutrition|Oceania
Volume: Vol.14, 1988
Collation: p. 68-96

Abstract: This paper attempts to look at the role of the media, with particular focus on the role of the "medium" of the daily newspaper in Fiji, in promoting consumerism, the consumption of inferior foodstuffs, and increasing malnutition in the Pacific Islands

Original information

Title: Contesting community : the labour question and colonial reform in the post-war Territory of Papua and New Guinea, 1942-1946

Author: Wright, Huntley
Subject:  Unemployment|Social aspects|Papua New Guinea
 Social stability|Papua New Guinea
Volume: Vol.25 no.1, 2001
Collation: p. 69-94

Abstract: Recent political events in Fiji. and the continuing problems of security in Papua New Guinea. have brought into focus an implicit contradiction in the contemporary discourse on 'governance'. namely its equation of 'community' with 'civil society' (see Grischow. 1998).

Original information

Title: Continuity and change in Papua New Guinea's border relations with Indonesia

Author: Premdas, Ralph R.
Subject:  Indonesia|Boundaries|Papua New Guinea
 Indonesia|Foreign relations|Papua New Guina
 Papua New Guinea|Foreign relations|Indonesia
Volume: Vol.11, 1985
Collation: p. 63-90

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Contributors

Author:
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.27 no.1, 2004
Collation: p. 303

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Contributors

Author:
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.30, 2007
Collation:

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Control, alt, delete : how Fiji's new prelectoral system and media coverage affected election results for women candidates in the 2014 election

Author: Liki, Asenati, Slatter, Claire
Subject:  Womem political candidates|Oceania
Volume: Vol.35 no.2, 2015
Collation: p. 71-88

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Convergence of accounting standards in the South Pacific island nations : the case of Fiji

Author: Chand, Pramod
Subject:  Accounting|Standards|Fiji
Volume: Vol.28 no.2, 2005
Collation: p. 269-290

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Covenant or contract : the treaty of friendship between New Zealand and Samoa 1962

Author: Devere, Heather, Ligaliga, Michael Fusi
Subject:  New Zealand|Foreign relations|Western Samoa
 Western Samoa|Foreign relations|New Zealand
Volume: Vol.33 no.2, 2013
Collation: p. 95-112

Abstract: This paper looks at different interpretations of the 1962 Treaty of Friendship between New Zealand and Samoa, to uncover possible sources of misunderstanding between the two nation states

Original information

Title: Creating an enabling environment for indigenous business in Fiji

Author: Appana, Subhash
Subject:  Fiji Indigenous Business Councill
 Small business|Management|Fiji
Volume: Vol.32 no.2, 2012
Collation: p. 50-68

Abstract: The ongoing strains qf a sustained global economic downturn ha:ve forced a shift in focus to how individual countries can generate small-scak inward-focused eco1lfJmic activity whik waitingfor the global eC01lfJmy to regain its vibranry. It is in this regard that SM& ha:ve gravitated to centre stage, especiallY in isolated developing economies. In Fiji, recent government poliq has prioritised 'selfhelp' and 'selfsuiJiciency'in a marked departure.from the established outward-focus that characterised policies during the second half qf the 1980s and much qf the next 2 decades. A mqjor concern that all qf Fiji's governments ha:ve had to grappk with has been an increasinglY insistent ethnic-Fijian desire to participate in a more uisibk manner in the commercial sector. GWen Fiji's sociopolitical composition, this opens up promising avenues for mobilising hitherto dormant resources ond encournging indigenous business within the SME framework. After providing a critical historical overview qf indigenous business initiatWes in Fiji, this paper contends that many qf the reasons for past shortcomings had to do with a political reluctance to aclrnowkdge openly the need for strict eco1lfJmic solutions to business problems. A mqjor shortcoming in this regard was the triuialisation qf the tenet qf accountability in the interests qf political expedieruy. This paper proposes an enablingframework for indigenous business management It concludes l!J! proposing a number qf sectors that '!.!fer encournging opportunities for indigenous business within the SME framework.

Original information

Title: Crime, community penalty and integration with legal formalism in the South Pacific

Author: Findlay, Mark
Subject:  Crime law|Oceania
 Customary law|Oceania
Volume: Vol.21, 1997
Collation: p. 145-160

Abstract: This paper prefers to explore the adaptation of legal formalism in contexts of resilient and resonant custom.

Original information

Title: Crown ownership of foreshores and seabed in Solomon Islands

Author: Kabui, Frank
Subject:  Water rights|Solomon Islands
 Customary law|Solomon Islands
Volume: Vol.21, 1997
Collation: p. 123-144

Abstract: Crown ownership of the foreshores and the seabed is a common law principle. It is the law of England. Introduced in 1893 by virtue of the Pacific Order in Council 1893, it has become part of the law of Solomon Islands

Original information

Title: Cultural tourism and its potential for Fiji

Author: King, Brian
Subject:  Heritage tourism|Fiji
 Tourism|Fiji
Volume: Vol.16, 1992
Collation: p. 74-89

Abstract: In this modified paper, the author will feature definitions of cultural tourism and some related concepts, consider the arguments for and against cultural tourism and examine cultural tourism as one of the possible alternatives for changing the tourism emphasis in Fiji.

Original information

Title: Cushioning the shock of early retirement policy : a human resource management perspective of revitalising the teaching workforce

Author: Lingam, Govinda Ishwar
Subject:  Retirement|Government policy|Fiji
 Retirement
Volume: Vol.32 no.2, 2012
Collation: p. 87-102

Abstract: This paper focuses on dClJeloping and managing the teaching wurlifince in Fiji. 8pecifical!J; the paper examines the sudden lowering 'If retirement age 'If public servants including teachers and the need for the empif!ying authorities to manage their teaching uxnIifOrce more iffoctWely. Teachers are the most significant resource in schools, especUd!Ji in developing contexts as ~ pfo); a key role in children's education and school improvement ifforts. Based on the premise that teachers deserve the most attentWn, the paper highlights potential risks 'If inappropriLlte strategies for developing and managing the teaching worlifOrce, which could have for-reaching iffocts on all spheres 'If a nation's development. The paper argues the putting in place 'If mechonisms to avoid premature loss 'If teachers from the profission. The findings.from the literature discussed in this paper have implicatWns 'If relevance to education policies and pions, and identifies practices necessary to improve the management 'If teaching resources, an essential forerunner to improvement 'If the qualitY 'If education in Fiji.

Original information

Title: Custom and constitutionally protected fundamental rights in the South Pacific Region : the approach of the courts to potential conflitcs

Author: Farran, Susan
Subject:  Customary law|Oceania
 Civil rights|Oceania
Volume: Vol.21, 1997
Collation: p.103-122

Abstract: As a form of social regulation, custom is characteristic of traditional societies. As societies develop, custom gives way to law, either being replaced by it or by taking on the form of law itself, becoming customary law.

Original information

Title: Custom and the law

Author: Paterson, D.E
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.25 no.1, 2001
Collation: p. 146-148

Abstract: Book Review

Original information

Title: Customary rules and the welfare principle : post-independence custody cases in Solomon Islands and Vanuatu

Author: Brown, Kenneth
Subject:  Customary law|Melanesia
 Custody of children|Melanesia
Volume: Vol.21, 1997
Collation: p. 83-101

Abstract: Since the advent of independence in Solomon Islands on 7 July 1978 and Vanuatu on 30 July 1980, customary law has been given official recognition as part of the law of the land by virtue of provisions contained in the respective Constitutions of the two countries.

Original information

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