JOURNAL OF PACIFIC STUDIES
A B C D E F G-H I J-L M N-O P Q-R S T U-V W-Y 0-9

Title: Gender, class and race dynamics : Indian women in sugar production in Fiji

Author: Shameem, Shaista
Subject:  Women, East Indian|Fiji|Social conditions
 Women sugar workers|Fiji|Social conditions
 Sugar workers|Fiji|Social conditions
Volume: Vol.13, 1987
Collation: p. 10-35

Abstract: This paper attempts to, firstly by providing a critique of studies on indentured labour, and secondly, by proposing an alternative framework for the analysis of Indian history in Fiji which examines unequal relations between genders as well as classes and races

Original information

Title: Gender Differences in HIV Risk Perception and Sexual Behaviour of Young Adults in Metropolitan Areas of Fiji

Author: Singh, Gurmeet, Sewak, Aarti, Reddy, Karuna G., Ram, Sharan
Subject:  Gender Differences
 Sexual Behaviour
 Sexual Health
Volume: Vol. 39, no. 1, 2019
Collation: p. 102-127

Abstract: This study seeks to understand variations in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) risk perception and sexual behaviour among male and female adults in Fiji. The Second-Generation Surveillance Report (2006) indicates the median age of first sex within the youth group as 16 years (range 10 – 23 years). Therefore, this study was purposively targeted at individuals of reproductive age, preferably 10 years and above. We utilized convenience sampling to collect 137 self-administered surveys from individuals working in both public and private sector organizations in two highly populated areas of Fiji. Independent samples t-test analyses revealed that men living in urban areas are more likely to experiment with multiple sexual partners, have a higher tendency of engaging in sexual practices, and are highly likely to have unsafe sex with multiple partners. Gender-sensitive interventions may help facilitate and achieve positive behaviour change among males and influence the sexual health of females.

Original information

Title: Genetic loss in food crops in the Pacific : socio-economic causes and policy issues

Author: Tisdell, C. A. (Clement Allan), 1939-
Subject:  Biodiversity loss
 Crop varieties
 Food security
Volume: Vol.36 no.2, 2016
Collation: p. 24-41

Abstract: Genetic diversity of traditional food crops is declining in the Pacific Islands. Background information on the evolution of the diversity of these crops is provided, socioeconomic reasons for this loss are outlined, the economic consequences of this loss are analysed, and the economic benefits and costs of conserving crop varieties is examined. The potential economic benefits foregone by failing to conserve a crop variety are shown to depend on the nature of the demand function for the crop’s production. The economics associated with the conservation of crop diversity by in situ and ex situ methods are discussed.

Original information

Title: Geography.......the next most important subject

Author: Forster, J.J.H., Bryant, J.J., Thaman, R.R.
Subject:  Geography|Oceania|History
Volume: Vol.09, 1983
Collation: p. 133-179

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: The global agro-food complex, neoliberalism and small farmers in Chili : Lessons for the Pacific Islands?

Author: Murray, Warwick E.
Subject:  Export marketing|Chile
 Export marketing|Oceania
Volume: Vol.22, 1998
Collation: p. 27-59

Abstract: In this paper an attempt is made to trace out some of the possible implications of the globalisation of agriculture and neoliberal restructuring for small-scale growers in so-called Southern countries.

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Title: Globalisation and workplace reforms in two regional agri-food industries : Australian meat processing and Fiji's sugar mills

Author: Snell, Darryn
Subject:  Sugarcane industy|Fiji|Planning
 Meat industry and trade|Australia|Planning
Volume: Vol.24 no.1, 2000
Collation: p. 51-76

Abstract: This paper presents two case studies—the Australian beef industry and Fiji’s sugar industry. It compares and contrasts recent reform efforts in the processing sectors (i.e. meat processing and sugar milling) of each of these industries.

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Title: Global liberalism? : rethinking the 'third world' after the cold war

Author: Berger, mark T.
Subject:  International Finance
 International history|1990
Volume: Vol.17, 1993
Collation: p. 4-37

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Good governance and development in the Pacific

Author: Babacan, Hurriyet
Subject:  
Volume: Vol.34, 2014
Collation: p. 7-22

Abstract: This article explores the link between 'god governance' and development

Original information

Title: Hayden White and the burden of history

Author: Subramani, Anurag
Subject:  Positivism
 Narrativity
 Literature
Volume: Vol.36 no.2, 2016
Collation: p. 108-123

Abstract: In his essays “The Burden of History” (1966), “Interpretation in History” (1972), “The Historical Text as Literary Artefact” (1974), “The Value of Narrativity in the Representation of Reality” (1980) and “Getting Out of History” (1982), Hayden White discusses the main tenets of his theory of historiography, narrativity and, inevitably, the relationship between the history and literature. In the essays, White argues for a common constructivist character of history and fiction, and rejects the Rankean notion of a ‘science of history’. Drawing support from the historiographical and literary theories of Claude Lévi-Strauss, R. G. Collingwood and Northrop Frye, White suggests historians must acknowledge history’s basis in the literary arts and treat the historical text as a literary artefact in order for the discipline to regain the prestige that it enjoyed in the early nineteenth century. The kind of eclectic history that White advocates is found in Klaus Neumann’s Not the Way it Really Was, a text that itself rejects a positivist view of history.

Original information

Title: The Health status of the Silver Generation in Fiji

Author: Seniloli, Kesaia, Tawake, Rupeni
Subject:  Ageing
 Health status
 Social disability
Volume: Vol.35 no.3, 2015
Collation: p. 168-187

Abstract: The proportion of the population aged 55 years and over in Fiji has increased over the years as progress in social and economic conditions extends. The best possible health of the elderly population is of obvious importance to their families, the community and the nation as a whole. This paper examines the demographic, social and economic factors that determine the health status of our elderly people. The importance of this study lies in the dearth of current knowledge on the health status of elderly persons in Fiji. It will contribute to the literature on elderly issues in Fiji and the wider Pacific. Given that ageing issues do not gain much attention in Fiji’s national policies, our hope is that with ample knowledge of their health status, we can help government and other stakeholders work towards upholding the standard of living of the elderly in Fiji. The study used a structured questionnaire to interview 815 elderly in both rural and urban areas of Fiji. The application of the proportional odds model showed that marital status, ethnicity, area of residence, age and household size are significant determinants of the health status of the elderly. The poor economic status of the elderly is also an important determinant because it affects their use of health services, ability to purchase western medicine and their ability to have a healthy life in general.

Original information

Title: Healthy tourism in a Fijian context : a WHO initiative for island tourism

Author: Staiff, Russell , Bushell, Robyn
Subject:  Health|Tourism|Pacific|Participation
Volume: Vol.26 no.1&2, 2004
Collation: p. 105-130

Abstract: This paper describes research undertaken to assist in the institutionalisation of the ethic of sustainability into tourism planning and operation. It involves developing a conceptual framework for Healthy Tourism in island microstates in the Western Pacific Region. Such a quest, to be achieved in a way that is sensitive to local geography and under the auspices of an international body such as the World Health Organization, is complex. This paper explores issues prompted by such a project. A case study of Fiji before the 2000 constitutional crisis is presented. The paper investigates attempts by the WHO to bring together tourism and the health of destination communities. It describes the theoretical contexts of tourism and health, along with the issues arising from a series of workshops conducted in Suva in March 2000. Together, these highlight implications for planning a healthy tourism concept that focuses on the health and well-being of locals as well as the safety of tourists.

Original information

Title: Healthy, wealthy and wise : the national government of Tokelau after 150 years

Author: Angelo, Tony
Subject:  Law|Tokelau
Volume: Vol.21, 1997
Collation: p. 215-224

Abstract: In the last 150 years there has been contact with outside influences, the impact of which has, in population and numerical terms, been disproportionate.

Original information

Title: The higher-energy coasts of Southern Viti Levu, Fiji with particular reference to the geomorphology of the Deuba coast

Author: Shepherd, Michael J.
Subject:  Coast changes|Fiji|Coral Coast
Volume: Vol.14, 1988
Collation: p. 1-19

Abstract: This paper will be concerned chiefly with the geomorphology of a stretch of coast loosely known as the Deuba coast which extends about 8 kilometres to the west of the mouth of the Deuba River distributary of the Navua Delta

Original information

Title: The historian as political actor in polity, society and academy

Author: Pocock, J.G.A.
Subject:  History|Philosophy
Volume: Vol.20, 1996
Collation: p. 89-112

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: The history of the Fijian languages

Author: Tryon, Darrell
Subject:  Fijian language
 Fiji|Languages
Volume: Vol.10, 1984
Collation: p. 114-117

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

Title: Holistic, participatory and strategic : a vulnerability and adaptation assessment for Pacific communities faced with climate change

Author: McNamara, Karen Elizabeth, Limalevu, Leone
Subject:  Adaptation
 Environmental change
Volume: Vol.35 no.3, 2015
Collation: p. 28-39

Abstract: Community-based climate change vulnerability and adaptation assessments are burgeoning, matched by an expanding body of literature on vulnerability, resilience, adaptive capacity and adaptation. However, too often, these assessments are subjective, rapid and merely consultative which can lead to a lack of community ownership over adaptation projects and potential failure. This has been particularly common in the so-called ‘frontline’ states where large donor funding has flowed to in the last decade or more. Despite extensive local knowledge of environmental change and strategies to respond to such, the Pacific region is often depicted as ‘most vulnerable’ to the impacts of climate change; however, a one-size-fits-all vulnerability and adaptation assessment is challenging to develop effectively. This article provides details of the development and use of a community-based vulnerability and adaptation assessment that has been applied in 15 countries and close to 40 communities throughout the Pacific region. The assessment is not a single prescribed method; it is an approach that can be adapted to diverse communities and places and ensure a shared and open dialogue between external parties and local communities. It involves a number of critical steps and utilises a variety of techniques to collect data including field observations, in-depth focus group discussions, field assessments and group workshops. Three overarching principles guide the assessment. These include the need to: holistically capture the numerous assets that communities utilise to sustain their livelihoods (as vulnerability can be influenced by a host of factors); guarantee community participation and an ongoing two-way dialogue and sharing of knowledge; and ensure that medium and long-term community plans and goals are developed to help safeguard the sustainability and longevity of these communities.

Original information

Title: Houses far from home : British colonial space in the New Hebrides

Author: Kaplan, Martha
Subject:  British|Dwellings|Vanuatu
 Dwellings|Social aspects|Vanuatu
 Colonial administrators|Housing|Vanuatu
Volume: Vol.27 no.1, 2004
Collation: p. 109-111

Abstract: [ Abstract not available ]

Original information

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