JOURNAL OF PACIFIC STUDIES
A B C D-E F G H-J K L M N O-P Q-R S T U-V W-Y
close this section of the library
Chappell, David(1)

Title: The black and the red : radicalising anti-colonoialsim in 1970s New Calendonia

Author: Chappell, David
Subject:  New Caledonia|History|Autonomy and independence movements
 New Caledonia|Politics and government|20th century
Volume: Vol.27 no.1, 2004
Collation: p. 49-62

Abstract: The tragic ‘Events’ of the 1980s in French New Caledonia, when competing versions of nationhood caused inter-ethnic violence, led to peace accords in 1988 and 1998 that proposed a ‘common destiny’ for the inhabitants. But the increased autonomy Paris is now granting to the territory over fifteen to twenty years had already been granted in 1956–58 and then taken away in the 1960s. Four forces converged in about 1969 to radicalise local anti-colonialism, and thus polarise the multiracial society that had begun to emerge in the postwar period: France’s unilateral withdrawal of self-government, despite protest; renewed immigration because of a nickel boom; the decline of the first political party of the territory, the Union Calédonienne; and the return home from France of Kanak and Caledonian university students, after their exposure to the ideas of Marxism and other liberation ideologies. The latter regarded what was happening in their homeland as a ‘recolonisation’. But if human beings can create such structures, they can also amend or re-adjust them, thanks to the hard-learned lessons of their modern history.

Original information

Disclaimer & Copyright l Contact Us l USP's 50th Anniversary Website l 
© Copyright 1968 - 2018. All Rights Reserved.
The University of the South Pacific
Laucala Campus, Suva, Fiji
Tel: +679 323 1000